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Fall 2021 Science Clubs

Registration is now open for our Virtual Fall 2021 Science Clubs! We’re excited to be expanding to serve 350 girls this fall! Apply today to become a participant (K-8th grade) or Junior Mentor (8th - 12th grade)—or apply to be a Volunteer Mentor to teach the clubs! Learn more and register on our Programs page.

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SCFGLive! is Now on Comcast Xfinity!

Science Club for Girls is excited to announce that our live science show, SCFGLive!, is now on-demand on Comcast Xfinity! Simply say “Science Club for Girls” into your Xfinity voice-activated remote to watch on-demand episodes of our live science show. With our new Comcast Xfinity partnership, girls and families can access SCFG programming from Virginia to Maine. SCFGLive! engages the whole family with hands-on STEM experiments. Be sure to share SCFGLive! with a young scientist in your life today!

We Got a 2021 Women's Foundation of Bost

Science Club for Girls Awarded Women’s Foundation of Boston Grant!

 

Science Club for Girls (SCFG) is proud to announce that we are the recipient of a 2021 Women’s Foundation of Boston grant! We are very grateful for the continued support of the Women’s Foundation of Boston that will fund SCFG’s dual mode STEM programming, both in-person and virtual, with the hiring of a program manager and communications associate. The Women’s Foundation of Boston is a nonprofit public charity that creates, funds, and accelerates high-impact economic and leadership programs that equip Greater Boston women and girls to be financially independent and successful leaders. For more information, please visit www.wfboston.org.

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Science Club for Girls Got a Cummings Grant!

 

Science Club for Girls is proud to be a recipient of a 2021 Cummings Grant from the Cummings Foundation! Through their $25 Million Grant Program, the Cummings Foundation supports local Massachusetts nonprofits in education among other areas. Thank you to the Cummings Foundation for supporting young women and girls in STEM! To learn more about Cummings Foundation, visit www.CummingsFoundation.org

Empowering girls to embrace STEM through meaningful mentorship and free, hands-on experiences

To foster excitement, confidence and literacy in STEM for girls, particularly those from underrepresented communities by providing free, experiential programs and by maximizing meaningful interactions with women STEM mentors.

Celebrating 25 years of successfully providing programs for girls in our community to address the gender and diversity imbalance in STEM. SCFG provides free after school "clubs" at schools and community locations.

Volunteer, participate, or donate. SCFG relies upon the generosity of our supporters to maintain, nourish and grow. Your involvement makes a powerful statement about your commitment to racial and gender equity in STEM.

TOP FUNDERS

Thank you for your support

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I’m not sure I’d be where I am if I hadn’t had mentors and peers in Science Club who encouraged me to pursue what I wanted and helped me build the confidence to get there.
— Sophie, Junior Mentor

What We Know

  • An achievement gap exists between well-resourced and economically-stressed children from the moment they begin school.

  • Research on how children learn shows that learning that happens outside of the traditional classroom helps students see the relevance of academic subjects and leads to deeper interest, which in turn directly impacts achievement.

  • The achievement gap between black and Hispanic students and their white and Asian peers was evident in the 2017 Next Generation math MCAS scores

 

  • The number of white students whose scores exceeded the standards was four times higher than black or Hispanic students, and the number of black and Hispanic students who did not meet the standard was almost three times as high as white students.

  • Research shows that girls begin to associate boys with science and math as early as grade two, and middle school is often when stereotypes and harmful associations cause many girls to avoid STEM subjects.

 

Economic Policy Institute 2015.

National Research Council 2009, 2011.

Department of Education 2017 profiles http://profiles.doe.mass.edu/statereport/nextgenmcas.aspx

Cvencek, D., Meltzoff, A.N., and Greenwald, A.G., Child Dev. 2011 May-Jun;82(3):766-79.